Effective Tips for Managing Stress in College

by:

Self Improvement

Acute stress leads to reactive mental disorders (even psychosis), post-traumatic stress disorder, which can provoke a sharp exacerbation of somatic diseases. Being a student, you read this and think that such issues would never be a part of your life, that such things relate to much older people. However, stress causes serious problems for people of any age, and you are not an exception. That is why you need to learn how to manage stress and reduce anxiety.

Make a List of the Most Stressful Things in Your Life

Those can be personal matters, social life, education in general, financial situation, your thoughts about the future, bad relationships with some of your professors, difficult class, too overwhelming writing load. Even writing these things down has a therapeutic effect. You face your enemy, and it stops being so strong. When you write down those things, you will see that they can be put in groups. One group may be related to social interactions, one to self-esteem, another to your worries about the future (career, finances, right/wrong choice of your specialty), etc. 

Write One Thing You Can Do This Week For Each Group

For example, you are worried about your profession. Look for some alumni you can contact and talk about how their career developed, how they used the education similar to yours, get some tips. Or you can look for brief internships, which will help you understand whether the chosen profession is a perspective choice for you. If you feel overwhelmed with writing assignments, and you are sure there is no way you can deal with them before the deadline, you may decide to buy a research paper online and move forward with other tasks. Delegating some of your assignments to a professional agency such as WriteMyPaperHub will help to balance your routine. 

More Oxygen, Less Social Media, Plus Somewhat Balanced Nutrition

It would be strange if we started to offer you to start leading a perfectly healthy life of an Instagram diva. You are a student, you cannot have oatmeal with only locally grown fruits and chia seeds for breakfast every day, later meditate for an hour, do yoga for another hour and go for a run every night. However, there are things you can realistically do for your health to reduce stress and anxiety.

  • Reduce sugars and added sugars, especially in beverages. Sugar makes your body crazy. It puts you into a sugar/insulin rollercoaster. It causes mood swings, sleeping problems, problems with concentration, etc. Several days count the approximate amount of sugar you consume and later try to reduce it by 10% every week. It is a slow pace, and you won’t feel uncomfortable.
  • Have more air. Our brain cannot operate without enough oxygen. You need to go for a walk once in a while. You need to open windows as much as you can. If you have the financial capacity, buy a HEPA filter for your room and wear a PM2.5 level mask when the Synoptics say the air quality drops dramatically. You will sleep much better when you have more air. And quality sleep reduces stress levels.
  • Reduce the consumption of social media content. Again, we know it is hard. The best way is to set a social media monitor and let it block the apps after some time limit. Social media is one of the most common anxiety sources these days. Bad news, tragic videos, someone’s perfect social media life — it all makes you stress out more.

Life is full of stress. No one has zero levels of stress, even Buddhist monks. You cannot be fully calm. It would mean you are dead. But you can reduce stress and anxiety levels rather successfully.

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